And Another Month Gone

Again! Is Covid-time faster than normal time? I think so! The weather has been really changeable and although we’ve had a few warm days it’s mostly somewhat cooler than usual for June. I’m even wearing a sweater today! At least I haven’t had to water the garden much. I really don’t feel as if I accomplished much this month at all. I mostly just read more books, pulled a few weeds and picked some produce. What does it say about me when my most exciting day is Laundry Day twice a month? Yeesh. Still no new Finished Objects to show. No knitting and very little sewing happened. I did repair my bug-munched top so I could wear it though.

Visible Mending

It took more time to choose the repair fabric than to actually perform the fix! I finally chopped up a dyed and stamped swatch from the scraps drawer and did some sloppy sashiko stitching on it and I think it looks passable. Hopefully I can get a few more years’ wear now. Loved clothes last!

Wearing it: front view
Wearing it: back view

When this thing finally gives out, I’ll probably make a new version. I still have the pattern I made. Or maybe I won’t wait until it dies to sew it again! It’s a great way to use up fabrics that are too small for a full garment. I think the design has held up well considering I saved the original inspiration photo nearly 10 years ago. Good wearable styles don’t date quickly.

However some things do get dated! I’ve been working on refashioning my indigo hemp jacket from the mid-’90’s. It absolutely did not fit anymore: drop shoulders, deep armholes, too long sleeves and tight waist and hip. Just wait until you see the “before” pics on me! But I absolutely love the funky fabric and the dyeing is a memorial to an epic indigo vat that my friends and I made one year. I’ve never been able to get something this large dyed that evenly since. Here’s a hanger shot just to whet your interest.

Indigo Hemp Jacket (before)

Notice that even the horn buttons dyed beautifully as well. (It was a wonderful vat!) Eventually I ended up picking out nearly every seam except for the collar and front placket. The thread I sewed it with was cotton so it would take the indigo and they are all flat-fell seams too so really sturdily stitched! Took ages, a sharp seam ripper and good light but I couldn’t figure out how else to reshape it. It needed extra fabric under the arms and down the side seams and I don’t have anything remotely similar in stash to piece with this it. I did find some denim that matched the colour pretty closely but wisely decided that it was too heavy and stiff. This hemp is thick and coarsely woven but drapey and fairly soft after being washed many times. So I went with something different but not too contrasting that just felt right. Not finished yet though so you’ll have to wait for the big reveal.

On another topic entirely I just wanted to mention the new Ravelry interface. Have you seen it yet? It’s been a big topic of conversation on my Instagram feed and there is quite a contingent of users who absolutely abhor it! Apparently it’s been an issue for those who suffer migraines and seizures. Personally as a senior and a migraineur, it did give my eyes the collywobbles at first too. However, after I discovered that they had eventually made some of the annoying things optional such as getting rid of the horrible drop shadows and changing the text font (which sort of solved my particular problem) it was passable. Barely. The text, icons and buttons are still too small especially on my iPad screen and there’s no permanent fix for that. I can zoom with the two finger spread of course but have to do that on every. single. page. The stark white background with skinny black type is still there. And yes, you can switch to “classic” Ravelry, which apparently isn’t actually Old Ravelry and is still a problem for some people. It’s not a forever option either. Not that anything is ever permanent on the Internet. (Unless it’s something you don’t actually want to be permanent!) FYI, I’ve been a Ravelry member since October 2007, nearly 13 years. I joined back in the days when you had to request a membership and wait until they issued you one. Yes, I’ve seen quite a few changes on there and most of them were changes for the better. Until now.

I really thought that Ravelry didn’t handle the criticism very well at all. I know change is hard for some people and some push-back is inevitable. But if a significant number of your users are complaining of physical discomfort or actual harm then maybe they have a real concrete reason for it? Brushing it off with a few quick optional or temporary fixes that you have to get on the site to access first is just plain ableism, people! And then patting yourself on the back for how well your site has done with sales and sign-ups since the rollout. Consider one explanation for that could be that everyone is stuck in the house, boredom is setting in and they want to fill the void with a useful craft? Doesn’t really prove that everyone loves it. So Ravelry currently has a questionnaire up. Which again you have to get on the site to access. I filled it out. Who knows if it will help at all? Meanwhile since I have all the patterns I need for the moment, don’t use the forums anymore, and haven’t really been knitting lately anyway, I’ll just leave them to it for now. At least I got my opinion out there. Use your words! My new motto.

Carrying On

How is everyone holding up? Out in cyberspace I see lots of calming videos and images and lots of jokes and laughter too. Keep it up! We can get through this together even if we have to all stay apart. Best line I saw somewhere that stuck with me is this:

Introverts, put down your book and go check in on the poor extroverts now. They’re suffering!

I know. It’s not so funny if you’re truly lonely and isolated. But society is usually so dominated by the extroverts among us that it’s kind of interesting that we introverts actually have an advantage during the current situation. I can be alone for awhile without becoming lonely. I don’t need (or even want) constant stimulation and conversation. Plus I have lots of solo activities that I enjoy. On the other hand if this goes on too long, I’m kind of glad I’m sharing my isolation space with my spouse! Who is also an introvert.

You know, everyone talks about COVID-19 but do you personally know anyone who has it? My son picked up what we think is the dreaded virus at his shop thanks to an inconsiderate customer. It’s unconfirmed. He can’t get tested because they’re saving that for the serious cases but in consultation with the BC Health med-line and his doctor by phone, they’re pretty sure. Luckily he’s not too ill and is on the mend now. His family (wife and two teenagers) haven’t shown signs of coming down with it. Yet. Though the kids might kill each other first! They’re self-isolating in their small apartment with the golden retriever while building comes to a halt (by government order) on their new one. It’s already a year behind schedule. Are we having fun yet? Kind of happy we haven’t seen any of our kids in person for nearly a month! But I worry about them all.

So I finished a thing. When I discovered that I cut this jacket out back in November, I was amazed that it took me so long! Of course I was distracted by the Make Space Project. Even I am not that slow of a sewist. I had it half finished and hanging out on Debbie Double for months so I finally got it together and got it done. It’s dark and rainy today so I settled for a hanger shot with supplementary lighting.

In The Folds Flynn Jacket
Inside view of the seams

It turned out a little more oversized than I prefer but it’s not really any worse than my Issey Miyake jacket. I actually used the same size as my vest version that I made last year but the jacket has more ease with that wide back pleat and drop shoulders. I did get the sleeves the right length exactly though so I don’t have to turn up the cuffs unless I want to. There was a little trouble with the drapey linen crepe fabric stretching out on the seams. They’re a little wavy especially down the front edges. I probably really should have used my walking foot but didn’t. I was too busy switching back and forth from the regular foot to the stitch-in-the-ditch foot to sew the binding. I love that foot! I never had one with my old sewing machine and it just makes getting really close to the seam so easy. Also happiness for snap-on feet too. On the other hand, the walking foot is a lot more involved to install than my old Pfaff’s IDT foot which was built in. Ya wins some; ya loses some.

I’ve been out in my garden and for plenty of walks while the sun was shining. I got my peas planted a week early this year! My wee seedlings are going to need transplanting into bigger pots very soon (like starting tomorrow). And then begins the Daily Schlep – taking them out to the greenhouse every morning and back inside every evening until they are ready to go in the garden. There’s not enough room under the lights for them all and I need space to plant the tomatoes very soon. I was realizing that it’s a very good thing that I was able to buy my seeds before all the shops shut or I would have had to resort to mail ordering them. Not sure if we’re going to get our scheduled manure order delivered in a couple of weeks or not. We’re all in a waiting game here, aren’t we?

Sending virtual hugs to everyone! Stay well and stay occupied as best you can. As my auld Scots mum used to say: “This too shall pass”.

Woof!

We’re well into the dog days of summer here. I can tell because I feel like I should be panting with my tongue out like a dog! Hot. We spend half our lives watering the garden and the other half hunting for ways to use up all the beans and zucchini. Perhaps I planted too many but you never know how well they are going to do. Extra is better than not enough, right?

I have 6 different kinds of beans so they’re rather pretty together:

Many beans

Too bad the Burgundy ones cook up green and the speckled Dragon Tongues fade to yellow in the pot! Currently I have about 10 pounds worth in the fridge. We’re eating them as fast as we can because I won’t use them if they’re frozen or canned or pickled. Fresh is best!

So my studio has been rather steamy even with the big fan on but I have been persevering with the sewing anyway. In a switch from green I’ve been working on this brick red poly twill fabric that’s been lurking in the Deep Stash for who knows how long. I tested out the downsized version of Grainline’s Farrow dress with long sleeves.

Farrow dress with sleeves

This is a much smaller size than I made the first time and I like it much better. Not nearly so voluminous. Now I want another sleeveless one too! Putting it in the queue.

With the leftover twill I cut the outer layer of a slightly revised Sew Liberated Metamorphic Dress. The underlayer is a poly voile in a softly coordinating floral that’s probably been around since the 1980’s judging by the colours. So nice to use this stuff up finally! The bodice fits better on this one than my first attempt last year but for such a simple shape it seams hard to get right. At least it’s mostly pretty bra-friendly so I can wear it without a t-shirt underneath.

Metamorphic double layers
Flower side out

I like that there’s pockets on both layers, though I did increase the size of the outer patch pockets because they seemed a little too tiny. I’ve actually worn it with the floral side out most often even though I don’t think of myself as a flower print person.

So that’s the last of the brick red projects. Next up there’s a grey shirt. And then I’ll have to start cutting out more garments. No shortage of patterns and fabrics around here!

It’s Not Easy Being Green

Well, hello! I’ve been trying to get photos of my latest sewing but it has been very hot and I had no desire to model anything made of French terry. But needs must so I sucked it up for one garment anyway. First though, the two pieces that made a lazy flatlay:

Top and pants, not necessarily to be worn together

The top is the tunic from Love Notions La Bella Donna pattern. This version has elbow-length dolman sleeves with long cuffs and I used the bias-bound neckline from the t-shirt view. Unfortunately, this fabric isn’t very stretchy at all so the binding puckers a little but it doesn’t look too bad whilst wearing. I made the pockets a single layer underneath and top-stitched it to the tunic front so they are stable and don’t flop around as regular inseam pockets often do especially in knits. This was a pretty quick make since I’ve used this pattern before (for the snow-dyed hoodie version) and I’ve already done all my fitting changes. This one fits a little snugger however because of the thicker firmer fabric but it’s still comfy.

The cropped pants are from the pattern that I rubbed off a RTW pair and made before in grey knit. I left off the pockets this time and gave the rise another inch in height which seems more comfortable. Both of these garments have already been worn several times when we were camping on Vancouver Island so I guess they’re a good addition to the wardrobe. Yes, I laundered them first before the photo. Heh.

The last piece I made from this four-metre piece of French terry from Dressew’s bargain basement is the Robin Hoodie:

Hoodie Woman
Me, Mountain Goat?
Balance
Ta-da!

If I’m going to wear a warm hoodie dress on the hottest day of summer so far, you can bet I’m going to have fun doing it! The pattern is yet another hack of the Hey June Lane Raglan which I’ve used so often I’ve lost track of the variations. This is the first one I’ve tried with the hood and the thumb-hole cuffs (aka monkey thumbs). You can barely see them but I used tiny cord-locks on the drawstring cord that I got from our local outdoor fabrics store before it sadly closed a few years ago. Nice to find a perfect use for them. Instead of the usual kangaroo pocket I used the big pockets from the Helen’s Closet York Pinafore pattern.

So for once I’ve used all the fabric (six metres total) that I bought most recently before it sat in my stash for a couple of years…or decades. Six garments out of six metres: cap-sleeve tee (which I’m currently wearing), skimmies and leggings from the 2 metres of nylon/lycra and long-sleeved tunic, cropped pull-on pants and hoodie dress from the 4 metres of cotton French terry. At $4 per metre/garment I’d say I got my money’s worth, doncha think?

Last week when I went fabric shopping with my granddaughter I asked her to remind me that we were buying fabrics for her coat project, not for me. She was very diligent! I got nothing and she got:

Pattern and fabric for The Coat

The coat fabric is a bit soft but it’s glorious: wool and cashmere in a deep dark brown! We got that and the interfacing from Atex Designer Fabrics and the purple-brown lining from Dressew. She’s planning to make the longer ankle-length version of this princess-seamed open-front coat. Hopefully we can put enough structure into it to hold its shape without having to resort to elaborate tailoring. Neither of us are quite up for that! She’s really lucky that she’s got me and all the resources of my studio to make this big project that’s been stuck in her head for awhile. Even though she’s not-quite-15 (only a couple of weeks to her birthday!), she’s a pretty fearless sewist already. Hah, but she can’t sew unless she comes here because…I have her sewing machine! Mwa-ha-ha!! She’s gotten pretty good at taking public transit now, thank goodness. It’s about 25 kilometres from her house to ours and it takes about an hour and a half to get here. Now that’s dedication, no?

I’ll leave you this time with a photo from the walk Thom & I took today along our Vancouver harbour waterfront:

A view of Vancouver Harbour

Big Holland America cruise ship, the Westerdam, was at Canada Place over on the right there. (It’s heading to Alaska as I type.) Then we walked west toward Stanley Park, turned south and skirted Lost Lagoon, and eventually hit English Bay:

English Bay

We had lunch at the Cactus Club on the beach and then continued (well fed and lubricated with local beers) down Davie Street to the Roundhouse Skytrain Station and home. A total of nearly 10 km walk in gorgeous sunny and not too hot weather! Gotta take it while you can get it. Right?