Splat!

And that was the sound of my best attempts at posting more often. Sigh. I have to admit that I’ve been having trouble sticking with anything much these days with the notable exception of reading a metric tonne of books. Or it would be a tonne if I read actual books instead of digital ones from the library! Current count is 100 since January 1. Halfway to my 2020 goal of 200 which is kind of wimpy since I read 207 in total last year. Yes, I read quickly. And I don’t skip anything either. My genre of the moment is Regency Romance. Fluff and nonsense of course, but I’m enjoying them. Makes a good contrast to current news anyhow. Just saying.

So I have a bunch of plans and ideas for projects but nothing has got me excited enough to start yet. I haven’t knit a stitch since I finished that last pair of socks. No winding of warps for more towels, though I’ve picked out some possible yarns. No sewing, not even to finish my Grainline Felix dress which has been languishing for months and months. Debbie Double is currently wearing the bodice in hopes of teasing me into getting it done. And I keep walking right past her! What is wrong with this damselfly? Where is my Maker’s Mojo?

One thing I have been doing is planning in attempt to get kickstarted on something. Anything! To that end I’ve discovered the wonder that is Trello – an online tool for project and task management. There are apps for every OS and they all sync together. I first heard of Trello on an episode of the Love To Sew podcast where Helen was waxing rhapsodic about it’s virtues for sewing plans. I kind of ignored that because I have my inventories of fabric and patterns (among other things) on my iPad in Sortly, which is an inventory app (now unfortunately subscription-based but I have a legacy access) and OneNote on the desktop, which I use as a whiteboard posting inspiration/pattern photos and jotting notes. I didn’t want to start all over again with yet another app that required me to input a bunch of data. Also Sortly has the advantage that its files are available to me offline so for example I can use my iPad to check pattern requirements for fabric yardages while in the store. So I wasn’t going to use Trello for inventory purposes.

However, Trello is much better than OneNote for planning! Much, much better. And the free level has all the tools and capacity that I need. Yay! Basically, you have “boards” that contain “lists” which in turn contain “cards”. Each card has a “front” side with its name and perhaps a cover photo, tags, dates, and progress. You can move the cards around in the list or from list to list or archive them if they’re no longer needed and they look nice and neatly lined up for you. When you click on the card, the “back” comes up and has space for all kinds of information. You can add details, tags, attach files and photos, dates, checklists and links. If you are working with someone else or a whole team you can allow everyone access to edit and comment. Pretty powerful stuff.

I’ve been setting up cards with photos of the pattern and any inspirational pictures, proposed fabric photos (copied from my Sortly inventory), notes, tags, Date Started and Date Finished fields, and a checklist so I can mark off steps like Pattern Printed, Fitting Changes, Cut Out etc. I love that I can link relevant tutorials and sewalongs directly into the Notes field so I can easily just click on them to bring up the website. You can also relate one card to another and attach the pattern’s PDFs if you want to keep them all in one place. I haven’t bothered though. To sum up, Trello is simple to use and very satisfying for an organisation junkie like myself. Helen has a great tutorial on how she uses it in a slightly different way on her blog so you can at least get a feel for what it looks like. You’re welcome.

One item I added to my Trello sewing board is a refashion/repair list. On it there is this top, which I made in 2013.

Anthropologie Knock-Off Top

It’s made from a patchwork of fabrics of various types and although it’s looking a bit faded here and there, I thought it was still wearable. Until I looked closer.

Back of the top
Closer still

See the holes? There are more on the other shoulder and at the back of the neck. This rayon is toast! I’ve always been fond of rayon with it’s drape and ease of sewing but I realise it has problematic origins as a fibre. And now I’m convinced that it really doesn’t hold up well enough over the long term. And I keep my clothes as long as I possibly can. So, what to do? I think I’m going to practice some Visible Mending and boro-stitch patches over the worst areas. We’ll see if that holds it for awhile longer. Unfortunately another rayon shirt I made in 2011 didn’t make it.

Rayon Batik Shirt
Holes, holes and more holes

The fabric is completely disintegrating! There are holes all over which amazes me actually because I don’t remember seeing them when I ironed this shirt last before it went into my storage closet with the summer clothes over the winter. Nothing else besides these two garments had holes. Definitely the rayon is the only fabric affected. Interesting. Oh my! I just had a thought! We have had a recent infestation of silverfish in the house! I’ve worked hard and have got the population way down with major cleaning and diatomaceous earth applications but it’s pretty hard to eliminate the beasts entirely. They are devilish fast and very smart and, yes, they love sugars and starches. Paper is a favourite diet item. Rayon is made from wood pulp the same as paper. Doh! That’s it! Mystery solved. Okay, I’m most definitely not planning to buy any rayon fabric in the future. I’ll stick with my favourite fibres, linen and wool, as much as possible. And of course it’s hard to avoid cotton. But meanwhile I have a stash that needs to be cut up and sewn together. Using some of those plans I’ve been working on.

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